October Tree Sale

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Time for Our Annual October Tree Sale

Time for our Annual Tree Sale. It’s the perfect time to select trees – especially deciduous ones for autumn leaf color!

The freshly planted roots love the warm soil, and the cooling temperatures are quite forgiving on the foliage. Add in impending rain and you’ve got the perfect formula for successful tree planting. We have a very large selection of trees waiting to get out of their pots and into your soil.

We are offering a 20% OFF on all our trees and conifer selection, Citrus, Tropical Fruit, and Avocados.

Extra savings include 50% OFF ALL Paper Pot Fruit trees; 50% OFF ALL Paper Pot Roses; (EXCLUDES Carpet roses). 50%

Stock is limited so come in early for the best selection.

This sale excludes any pre-ordered and special ordered items, Carpet Roses, Camellias, Shrubs, Perennials, and Vines.

This sale is limited to stock on hand only. No special orders will be processed at sale prices. All sales are final, so make your selections carefully!

Landscape Care and Feeding Calendar

Time to feed your landscape!

As the days shorten, a little rain enters the picture, and temperatures begin to drop, plant’s needs change. September is a transition month in the garden. For many plants, It’s a perfect time for one last feeding for others, the beginning of a winter feeding routine.

View this handy Landscape Feeding Schedule and prepare to nurture your beauties.
Download a printable version here.

Seize the Season

With Fall officially rolling in this month on the calendar (though maybe not on the thermometer), it’s time to design and plant your cool season garden!

Your wheelbarrow is brimming with starts and seeds for broccoli, cauliflower, beets, carrots, green leafy lettuces, kale, chard, cabbage, snow peas, snap peas, and mustards. Now what? Take a moment to envision how and where you can enhance your landscape by sowing this bounty.

Welcome

Create a welcoming entry statement in your garden with a small gate or pergola. This marks your garden as a special “place”.

Layout your crops with an eye for pattern. Plant colorful lettuces in a square instead of straight rows. Use cabbages to punctuate the corners. Border them with herbs or annuals – why not edible annual flowers like violas or nasturtiums? Or try a dynamic arrangement of diagonals or chevron patterns to lead your eye through the garden.

Add exclamation marks to the center of your plantings. Taller flowering herbs like dill or fennel or yarrow can give you some height while attracting all important pollinators. Or use a decorative structure such as a painted tee pee, a wire obelisk, colorful tomato cage or ornate trellis, or an Artichoke!

Plan tidy pathways made of bark or gravel to surround and organize your beds. No water use here. Put a couple of layers of overlapping cardboard underneath to keep down weeds.

Subdivide the interior space of large beds with an arrangement of stepping stones. Alden Lane has a beautiful collection of natural slate stepping stones.

Please protect your young tender seedlings from our still high temperatures with frequent watering and some shade during the hottest part of the day. Enrich your soil before planting with G & B Organic compost and Sure Start organic fertilizer.

Weren’t the Pluots heavenly this year? Don’t forget the after harvest fruit tree feeding. A good deep soak (15 gallons of water) followed by fertilizing with Master’s Fruit Tree fertilizer promotes vitality during the spring flowering and fruit set season. Add a shovelful of worm castings or chicken manure around each tree to condition the soil.

Cover Crops Improve Garden Soil

Cover crops are fast growing plants that are utilized by farmers and gardeners for one or more of their beneficial qualities and not usually intended as food crops.

A gardener will usually work these crops into the soil or remove them before they set seed. A healthy garden can benefit in several ways when cover crops are included in the annual rhythm of sowing and reaping.

It seems that for most any problem, there is a cover crop solution. Try one and you’ll notice over time how much better your garden performs with less input of extra water, fertilizer, and insecticide. Cover crops are the natural choice for a naturally better garden.

Some crops add nitrogen to the soil, pulling it from thin air. Others pull up minerals from deep underground and concentrate it in the topsoil as you till the plan under. Other cover crops work like a rototiller to loosen heavy soils with their vigorous roots.

How to Get Started with Cover Crops

Preparation can usually be minimal for sowing cover crops. Cultivate the soil to a depth of about 1 inch and rake out any large debris or weeds. Sow the seeds at the rate recommended on the packet. Seeds can usually be scattered evenly. After sowing, tamp down the soil lightly to create good contact between seed and soil. Water immediately after sowing, and keep the area moist until your plants emerge. After establishment, most cover crops require minimal additional water.
cover-crop-cloverIt is usually best to cut down or incorporate cover crops before they produce seed. Cut or till the plants just as they begin to flower or before. Small plants can be directly tilled into your soil. Larger plants can be cut down with a weed trimmer or mower and left on the soil surface to dry for a few days before they are roto-tilled in.
We carry an assortment of cover crop seeds from botanical interests as well as larger bags of Fava Beans, purple vetch, clover, alfalfa, and more.

Summer Citrus

Citrus are among the most versatile of the trees and shrubs that grow in our valley. They can be grown as a single specimen, in hedges, as a trellised espalier or in containers. Citrus offer beautiful foliage, decorative fruit and fragrant flowers. Summer, with all its warmth, is a perfect time to plant citrus. Establishing a citrus plant before frost can help it weather the winter.

Citrus collectionCitrus prefer a hot south or west facing location with good draining soil. A reflective wall or fence is helpful and planting a citrus under the south or west facing eve of the house will provide some important protection from winter cold temperatures. Citrus should not be planted in a low or soggy spot that has poor drainage or in a lawn. In fact, if possible, place the citrus in a raised bed for improved drainage.

Dig a planting hole three times as wide as the root ball and just as deep as the root ball. The edges of the planting hole should then be dug out deeper than the center to accommodate additional soil amendments.

Test how well the planting hole drains by filling the 1′ deep x 3′ wide hole 1/2 way with water. Make sure it drains completely overnight. If the water does not drain it may be necessary to raise the overall soil level by creating a mound or building a planting box or look for an alternate planting location. An open-bottom-box measuring 3’x3′ wide and 12″ deep makes a great raised bed.

Plant by carefully removing tree from its container. Gently loosen the outer edges of the root ball if the roots are tight, and place it in the hole so that the top of the root ball rests slightly higher than the existing ground level (never place any soil above the root ball, covering the stem). Improve the existing soil from the planting hole with Master Nursery Acid Planting Mix at a ratio of 75% Planting mix to 25% existing soil. To this improved soil, add the appropriate amount of Master Nursery Master Start or Sure Start and Iron Sulfate or Iron Plus; mix thoroughly. Back fill around the root ball with the improved soil mixture. Tamp to compress the soil as you go. Use some of the extra soil to build a circular dam around the new plant to hold a generous quantity of irrigation water.

citrus-plantingWater the plant thoroughly in the pot before planting and then again after you have finished planting it. Let the water soak in, and then water again. Citrus plants need less frequent watering than most garden plants once established. Give it a deep soak once or, at most twice week once established. Frequent watering is the most common cause of failure with citrus. Of course, if the weather is excessively hot, check daily and water as needed.

Begin to feed your new plant after a month with Master Citrus Food. Citrus plants appreciate a steady, light feeding, so divide a year’s supply of fertilizer into 12 equal parts and give your new plant a monthly feeding, year ’round.

We do guarantee our plants to grow, and we also recognize that we are partners with you in caring for your new plant. If you have any concerns about the health or vigor of your plant, please let us know right away. Often, we can suggest a corrective measure to keep plants thriving and healthy.

 

Tree Ripened Fruit From Your Own Garden

Better than Farm Fresh – Tree Ripened Fruit From Your Own Garden!
peachaln[1]For years Alden Lane Nursery has worked with Dave Wilson Nursery to purchase the best varieties of fruit trees, berries, and grapes for the Tri-Valley area. There’s nothing like the taste of fresh peach plucked from your own tree – warm, juicy and sweet or a warm, fragrant slice of apple pie made with apples from a tree you planted and nourished while it grew.

Check with us at Alden Lane for the right varieties for your home orchard. We’re all about home orchard culture that is different from commercial ventures. It’s about having fruit in the garden throughout the summer and fall seasons because you’ve planted varieties that produce one right after the other. It’s about taking advantage of the space you have to plant and recommending espaliers, four trees in one hole, hedgerows or whatever it takes to bring you the rewards of the best experience you’ve ever had plucking an apricot from your own tree and melting into the sweet taste. Ahhhh, now that’s heaven!!

Order 2018 Fruit Trees now for Best Selection and 20% Off
Now is the time to pre-order your fruit trees for arrival in mid-January of 2018.

Pre-orders can be placed anytime from now through November 5th, 2017.

Download a copy of our Special Order Fruit Tree List here.
This list goes beyond what we will carry to include the opportunity to order across our grower’s entire collection.

Download our 2018 Fruit Tree normal-stock collection
These trees and vines comprise our normal, in-stock collection for 2018, expected to arrive in January 2018.

Plants can be ordered from either list with the exception of those that are multi-grafted or espaliered.

Prevent Citrus Leafminer

obj6014geo3317pg352p7[1]Watch for Citrus Leafminer
Citrus leafminers have been regular visitors to Tri-Valley gardens over the past few years. They burrow into the citrus leaf and cause extensive damage to tender new growth. The leafminers thrive in the fresh new growth that is occurring now. Leaf

Leafminers originate when the tiny adult moth lays her eggs, they hatch, and the leafminer or larva burrows below the leaf surface. Hiding out between the upper and lower leaf surfaces makes Leafminers hard to control with sprays. Younger trees are especially vulnerable. Older trees, having a lot of older, tougher leaves should be fine without treatment but younger trees can be especially hard hit as most of their leaves are susceptible to damage.

As we come up on that time of year when prevention can be the best cure, we are getting the word out regarding what can be done to lessen the negative impact while there is time to take preventative steps.

Discouraging an over- abundance of new growth can be helpful in reducing damage. Plants that are watered more than 2x a week, and those receiving excessive fertilizing are more likely to produce the soft foliage that leafminers favor. Our grower recommends a steady, light supply of citrus food monthly as opposed to heavier feedings 3 times a year, as is common.

Hang Leafminer traps to detect proper time for spraying.

Hanging Leafminer traps can be an effective tool for knowing when to spray… hang traps in at least one of your citrus trees and monitor frequently so you can spot the arrival of adult moths.

Of greatest concern when applying any pesticide is protecting bees. Only apply pesticides after the citrus trees have bloomed so bees are not drawn to pollen while the tree is being treated. Citrus trees, for the most part, have long past their bloom period now, but pinching out flower buds if they appear after spraying will prevent the bees from visiting a plant that has been treated.

captain-jacks-rtuCaptain Jack’s is our go to organic spray. It has shown to be an effective treatment for the leafminer, especially when applied between the time adult moths arrive and young leafminers are visible.

Citrus trees are clothed in new foliage. Watch for activity then spray every 10-14 days. Watch closely for leafminer activity and pinch out affected leaves as soon as damage is detected.

Tasty Tropicals

Vivid green kiwis, buttery avocados, red strawberry guavas, plump passion fruits . . . all grown at home. Wait – what? You mean we can grow luscious tropical fruits right here in the Tri-Valley? I thought our Sunset Zone 14 (USDA Zone 9) winters were too cold for tropicals!

While it’s true we are a bit too cold for many truly tropical plants which come from a climate with nary a frost, with a little imagination and shift in our thinking we can grow lots of similar fruits which can withstand a bit of cold below 32 degrees. Many of these are from sub-tropical regions of the world. Not only will you be adding delicious treats to your yard, you also gain gorgeous assets in your landscape.

Lots of theses plants will look right at home in a landscape themed with layers of palms, large-leaved shrubs, and bright, hot flower colors, straight from your most recent vacation to the tropics. Plant them in sheltered spots in your yard – up close to your house on the south or the east side is a good spot for the most frost tender. Most like a minimum of six hours of sunshine to produce well. And think frost protection for at least the first few years – cover with frost blankets over the tops and down to the ground, and/or wrap with small incandescent Christmas lights for extra warmth.

Try growing a couple of these juicy edible tropicals:

  • Avocados – yes, challenging, but can be done! Pick a sheltered spot, and choose one of the hardier Mexican varieties, like ‘Stewart’, ‘Mexicola Grande’, ‘Fuerte’, or ­‘Zutano’. They ripen 6 to 8 months after flowering.
  • Bananas – though you won’t harvest any fruit, what a great accent plant, and probably the best way to grow your own plates!
  • Guavas – so many sub-tropical varieties! They are beautiful, small scale, easy to grow, evergreen trees or large shrubs which deserve a place in every yard. Consider flavors like Pineapple ‘Nazemetz’ or ‘Coolidge’; Strawberry; Lemon; Chilean with its fine-textured little round leaves; or the stunningly beautiful variegated Chilean Guava.
  • Kiwis – funny fuzzy little fruits from down under grow on vines overhead. It takes two to produce and they need a few years to settle in. Or try self-fruitful ‘Issai’ hardy kiwi vines, which are fuzzless.
  • Limes – add some sweet/sour zest to your Mexican and Caribbean dishes. ‘Bearss’ lime is an all purpose juicy workhorse, while the smaller, rounder Mexican lime dazzles in cocktails and for eating fresh.
  • Loquat – easy growing and tropical looking with its coarse texture and serrated large leaves. Try loquat for virtually effortless clusters of fruit.        
  • Passion Fruit – exquisite, weirdo purple and white and green flowers like something off a space ship give way to green, then purple hanging orbs with sweet orangy-citrusy pulp inside. Try spooning it out.

To grow tropicals, practice good soil preparation incorporating lots of compost. We recommend Bumper Crop. Raise up planting beds, and add Sure Start at planting. Mulch well, and water deeply, allowing ­plantings to dry down a bit between soaks.

Enjoy the fruits of your labor!

 

Planting and Growing Citrus


Citrus are the most versatile of the trees and shrubs that grow in our valley. They can be grown as specimens, in hedges, as espalier or in containers. Citrus plants offer beautiful foliage, decorative fruit, and fragrant flowers. Growing citrus can be easy; the difficulty is in selecting the variety which you will enjoy the most.

Growing Citrus

Choosing the Site
citrus-planting-diagramCitrus prefer a hot south or west facing location with good draining soil. Test how well the soil drains by digging a 1’x1′ hole. Fill it with water. The water must be gone in 24 hours. Citrus should not be planted in a low or soggy spot that has poor drainage or in a lawn. If the water does not drain it may be necessary to raise the overall soil level by creating a mound or building a planting box or look for an alternate planting location. An open-bottom-box measuring 3’x3′ wide and 8″ deep makes a great raised bed. A reflective wall or fence is helpful and planting a citrus under the south or west facing eve of the house will provide some important protection from winter cold temperatures.

Preparing the Planting Hole
Dig a hole three times as wide as the root ball and just as deep as the root ball. The edges of the planting hole should then be dug out deeper than the center to accommodate additional soil amendments. (See Illustration)

Improve the existing soil from the planting hole with Master Nursery Acid Planting Mix at a ratio of 75% Planting mix to 25% existing soil. To this improved soil, add the appropriate amount of Master Nursery Master Start and Osmocote Slow Release Fertilizer, mix thoroughly.

Planting
Plant by carefully removing it from its container. Gently rough the outer edges of the root ball if the soil is tight, and place it in the hole so that the top of the root ball rests slightly higher than the existing ground level (never place any soil above the root ball, covering the stem). Back-fill around the root ball with the improved soil mixture. Tamp to compress the soil as you go. Use some of the extra soil to build a circular dam around the new plant to hold a generous quantity of irrigation water.

Watering
Water the plant thoroughly after you have finished planting it. Let the water soak in, and then water again. Citrus plants need less frequent watering than most garden plants. Give it a deep soak once or, at most twice a week, depending on the weather, (frequent watering is the most common cause of failure with citrus). However, to preserve the crop, never let the plant dry out during the bloom & pea-sized fruit stages.

 

Prevent Worms in Cherries

Spotted Wing Drosophila or Cherry Fruitfly is affecting cherries and other soft-bodied fruits such as berries in California.  Numerous gardeners have complained about finding the little white worms in cherries just at harvest time.

These worms are the larvae of a fruit fly that has been a pest in Japan for decades but somehow made it to the US.  It has no known enemies in the US, so it has spread, unchecked, like wildfire.  This pest has turned up in raspberries, strawberries, and blueberries, but especially Cherries.

The University of California at Davis has guidelines for dealing with the past so homeowners can preserve their harvests.  For a detailed look at the problem check out the UC website: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/EXOTIC/drosophila.html.

Summarizing the approach suggested is as follows:

Good control can be achieved with a few well-timed pesticide sprayings beginning when the earliest maturing variety in the orchard is just starting to turn from green to straw-colored.

Spray trees using Spinosad or Malathion. Spinosad is Organic and has been seen to yield successful results, so it’s the preferred solution

Traps should also be set to determine if the fruit flies are present. Directions for making traps are included in links below.

It has been said that no treatment is effective unless the entire tree can be sprayed.

Helpful Links

Oregon State Extension has a nice collection of videos to help wth the control of Spotted Wing Drosophila Fly.