Planting and Growing Citrus


Citrus are the most versatile of the trees and shrubs that grow in our valley. They can be grown as specimens, in hedges, as espalier or in containers. Citrus plants offer beautiful foliage, decorative fruit, and fragrant flowers. Growing citrus can be easy; the difficulty is in selecting the variety which you will enjoy the most.

Growing Citrus

Choosing the Site
citrus-planting-diagramCitrus prefer a hot south or west facing location with good draining soil. Test how well the soil drains by digging a 1’x1′ hole. Fill it with water. The water must be gone in 24 hours. Citrus should not be planted in a low or soggy spot that has poor drainage or in a lawn. If the water does not drain it may be necessary to raise the overall soil level by creating a mound or building a planting box or look for an alternate planting location. An open-bottom-box measuring 3’x3′ wide and 8″ deep makes a great raised bed. A reflective wall or fence is helpful and planting a citrus under the south or west facing eve of the house will provide some important protection from winter cold temperatures.

Preparing the Planting Hole
Dig a hole three times as wide as the root ball and just as deep as the root ball. The edges of the planting hole should then be dug out deeper than the center to accommodate additional soil amendments. (See Illustration)

Improve the existing soil from the planting hole with Master Nursery Acid Planting Mix at a ratio of 75% Planting mix to 25% existing soil. To this improved soil, add the appropriate amount of Master Nursery Master Start and Osmocote Slow Release Fertilizer, mix thoroughly.

Planting
Plant by carefully removing it from its container. Gently rough the outer edges of the root ball if the soil is tight, and place it in the hole so that the top of the root ball rests slightly higher than the existing ground level (never place any soil above the root ball, covering the stem). Back-fill around the root ball with the improved soil mixture. Tamp to compress the soil as you go. Use some of the extra soil to build a circular dam around the new plant to hold a generous quantity of irrigation water.

Watering
Water the plant thoroughly after you have finished planting it. Let the water soak in, and then water again. Citrus plants need less frequent watering than most garden plants. Give it a deep soak once or, at most twice a week, depending on the weather, (frequent watering is the most common cause of failure with citrus). However, to preserve the crop, never let the plant dry out during the bloom & pea-sized fruit stages.

 

Father’s Day Pies

You can order your pie (fresh or frozen) in advance to enjoy with your BBQ. The cost is $14.95 per pie and must be ordered by June 13th.

Choose from Boysenberry, Blackberry, Mixed Berry, Blueberry, Peach Cobbler, and Strawberry Rhubarb and new this year, Boysenberry Cobbler and Cherry Cobbler.

These are 10″ pies and can be ordered fresh or frozen. Frozen pies have baking instructions on the bottom of the pie. Pies can last in the freezer for up to one year. All Pies are $ 14.95. These pies are available only by pre-order.

Call 925 447-0280

Prevent Worms in Cherries

Spotted Wing Drosophila or Cherry Fruitfly is affecting cherries and other soft-bodied fruits such as berries in California.  Numerous gardeners have complained about finding the little white worms in cherries just at harvest time.

These worms are the larvae of a fruit fly that has been a pest in Japan for decades but somehow made it to the US.  It has no known enemies in the US, so it has spread, unchecked, like wildfire.  This pest has turned up in raspberries, strawberries, and blueberries, but especially Cherries.

The University of California at Davis has guidelines for dealing with the past so homeowners can preserve their harvests.  For a detailed look at the problem check out the UC website: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/EXOTIC/drosophila.html.

Summarizing the approach suggested is as follows:

Good control can be achieved with a few well-timed pesticide sprayings beginning when the earliest maturing variety in the orchard is just starting to turn from green to straw-colored.

Spray trees using Spinosad or Malathion. Spinosad is Organic and has been seen to yield successful results, so it’s the preferred solution

Traps should also be set to determine if the fruit flies are present. Directions for making traps are included in links below.

It has been said that no treatment is effective unless the entire tree can be sprayed.

Helpful Links

Oregon State Extension has a nice collection of videos to help wth the control of Spotted Wing Drosophila Fly.

 

 

Planting Cucumbers, Melons & Pumpkins

Join us on May 13th at 10:00 a.m. as we discuss planting your melons, cucumbers, and pumpkins. We will also cover the subject of fungus control.

  • Top Cucumbers: Diva • Japanese • Persian • Lemon; Spaced two feet apart.
  • Top Pumpkins: Atlantic Giant • Howden’s Best • New England Pie • Jack B’ Little; Spaced five feet apart (plant pumpkins from seed through mid-June).
  • Top Melons: Ambrosia • Hale’s Best • Cantaloupe; Spaced five feet apart.

Conditions: All like sunny conditions, however, cucumbers can use support along a fence or trellis. Pumpkins and Melons prefer lots of room to grow. They will spread out from the center with large leaves filling any available space about a foot from the ground.

Planting Times: Try to plant seeds 1-2 weeks after the average last frost, but only if the weather will be consistently warm for a week (2-4 weeks for pumpkins). They prefer to start when the soil temperature is warm; during April-May. Any sprouted seedlings in a cell pack can be put in the ground right away. This allows them the time to acclimate to their new home.

Soil: 50% native soil, 50% Bumpercrop®

Water and Feeding: Regular water (3x per week). Keep cucumbers evenly moist to prevent bitter fruitGive new plants a gentle boost with E.B. Stone’s Organic Starter Fertilizer®, then feed monthly with Master Nursery Tomato and Vegetable Food® or E.B. Stone’s Organic Tomato and Vegetable Fertlizer®. Apply the fertilizer sparsely around the base of the plant. It can be mixed into the soil or left underneath a thick layer of mulch.

Prevention: To prevent weeds, use Concern Organic Weed Preventer. Apply to soil surface right after planting and water in. Add mulch to further reduce weed growth. A thick layer of mulch will make it easier to remove weeds and provides insulation for your soil. For weed elimination, spray weeds with undiluted distilled vinegar. Take care to not get vinegar on veggie leaves.

Solution to Common Problems: Cucumbers: Careful pruning and training on a trellis will lead to a stronger network of stems to support your large cucumbers. Allow spiders a home in between stems, or let loose some ladybugs or praying mantis on your plants to eat potential pests. Pumpkins & Melons: Mulch will prevent mud from splashing onto your pumpkins & melons. (Use organic veggie fertilizer to feed your pumpkins monthly and make them grow even bigger!)

Pest Control: Sprinkle soil/mulch surface with pet-safe Sluggo®. Place a SLUGX® container under the leaves using beer as an attractant and pest-killer. Bird netting can deter both birds and small animals from nibbling on your cucumbers.

Support: Cucumbers: Use big stakes connected with bird netting to create a fine trellis that doubles as an animal repellent. They are naturally curly on the ground when grown without a trellis. Pumpkins & Melons: Keep them on a flat even surface to minimize gravity’s effect on their shape.

Harvesting: Cucumbers: Begin growing in the summer around July and should be harvested before they get too mature. Use pruning shears to cut the stem an inch from the fruiting body. Pumpkins & Melons: (depending on their planting time and desired size) Use a Razor Tooth Pruning Saw to harvest your pumpkins from late summer to early winter, and your melons from late summer to fall.

Reference for planting times: http://www.almanac.com/gardening/planting-dates/CA/Livermore.

May Vegetable Guide

Vegetable Plant Time Amount
(family of 4)
Special Notes Plant Now
Artichoke Year ’round 3 – 4 plants Permanent, perennial.
4″ Pots
Beans, lima May – June 15 – 25 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown.
Beans, String April – May Then later again in July and August 15 – 25 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest.
From Starts or Seeds
Cantaloupes/Other melons April – June 5 – 10 hills Soil must be warm.
From Starts or Seeds
Carrots Year ’round 20 – 30 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest.
From Seeds
Chayote May – June 1 – 2 plants Vine
Chives Year ’round 1 clump Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown.
From Starts or Seeds
Corn, sweet April – July 20 – 30 ft. row Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. Soil must be warm.
From Starts or Seeds
Cucumbers April – July 6 plants N/A
From Seeds
Eggplant April – June 4 – 6 plants Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown.
From Starts
Okra May 10 – 20 ft. row N/A
From Starts
Parsley Year ’round 1 – 2 plants Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown.
From Starts
Parsnips May – July 10 – 15 ft. row N/A
Peppers April – July 5 – 10 plants Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown
From Starts
Pumpkins April – June 1 – 3 plants N/A
From Starts or seeds
Radishes Year ’round 4 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest.
From Seed
Squash, summer April – July 2 – 4 plants Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown.
From Starts or seeds
Squash, winter June – September 2 – 4 plants Known as winter Squash because it stores over winter but it grows in summer-fall.
From Starts or seeds
Strawberries June – September 12+ plants Bare root in November – 6-Pack arriving in Feb.
6-Packs Soon
Tomatoes March – July 6 – 10 plants Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Weather permitting, starting in March is possible.
From Starts
Turnips February – August 10 – 15 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown.
From Starts
Watermelons April – June 6 plants N/A
From Seeds

Versatile Peppers Warm and Cool

Peppers are definitely a diverse group in the garden, from sweet to blazing hot.  Every garden needs at least one either to warm a dish or cool a plate. Peppers like growing conditions similar to tomatoes but benefit from a bit of late afternoon shade. The following describes a few we have on hand today.

ANAHEIM PEPPER
80 Days to maturity. A mild California chili. Ripens from light green to dark green to red and grows 6-10 inches long by 1-2 inches wide. Can be used at any stage but is most often used green. Most often seared to remove the skins and then dipped in batter for chile rellenos. When red, it is hotter and usually dried for use. Many cultivars exist, hence their wide range on the Scoville scale (400-4000).

DeARBOL PEPPER
90-100 Days to maturity. A long (3-4″), thin, hot pepper. It is mature when red in color. Related to the Cayenne pepper, it rates 50,000-65,000 on the Scoville scale. Plants produce high yields. It is also dried, for craft projects.

CAYENNE LONG SLIM PEPPER
(Hot) Very hot fruits 5 in. long and ½ in. thick. Use fresh or easily dried for winter use. Harvest starts about 75 days after plants are set out. CAUTION: Use rubber gloves, or clean hot peppers under running water, to avoid skin burn from the pepper juice. 50,000-65,000 on the Scoville rating.

FRESNO PEPPER
90-100 days to maturity. A California hybrid similar to the jalapeno but meatier and thinner skinned. Medium hot when used green, hotter when red. Usually used fresh, not dried, in salsas. 5,000-10,000 on Scoville scale.

HABANERO PEPPER
90-100 Days to maturity. Fruits are 1-2 inches long, and lantern shaped. They start out green and ripen to bright orange and are reported to have a slightly fruity or citrus after-taste but is hotter when red.. 200,000 to 350,000 on the Scoville scale! Plants are bushy and can overwinter in a greenhouse.

SERRANO PEPPER
85 Days to maturity. Similar to a Jalapeno in size but thinner and meatier but most importantly, up to 5 times hotter! They emerge green and ripen to orange or red. 10,000 to 30,000 on the Scoville scale. Do not dry well.

JALAPENO PEPPER
80 Days to fruiting. Fruits are 3 inches long, smooth, green to red, with a slight taper and blunt end. Dry streaks or “stretch” marks are common and often indicate a hotter pepper. It is considered medium hot on the Scoville scale, rating 5,000-7,000. Can be eaten either green or red but is hotter when red.

EUROPEAN RED BELL PEPPER
70-80 Days to maturity. Fruits are 3-4 lobed, 6-8 inches long, have thick walls and a sweet, crisp flavor. Red bells provide 100% of the daily requirement for vitamin A.

YOLO WONDER PEPPER
70-80 Days to maturity. Fruits are 4 inches long and blocky, with thick skin and sweet flavor. This pepper does double duty as it can be eaten green or left to further ripen and enjoy it as a red bell.

GYPSY PEPPER
65-70 days to harvest. Fruit is 4 ½ inches long by 2 ½ inches wide and color from green to orange to red. Mild flavor Plants are compact.

COSTA RICAN SWEET PEPPER
70 days to harvest. Fruits are 3-4 inches long and tapered and are best picked when they turn a deep ruby red. Flavor is sweet with a fruity finish. They are great for frying or in salads. Plants are compact. Burpee selection.

ZAVORY PEPPER
90 days to harvest. An exciting breakthrough sure to become the conversation piece of your summer garden. Habanero peppers have a distinctive taste, but… ‘Zavory’ is the first ever Habanero with a mild heat registering only 100 Scoville’s! You can bite into one just like an apple and survive to tell the tale. The beautiful, shiny, 1-2 inch cardinal red fruits appear in large numbers in late summer on vigorous branching 30″ plants. Burpee selection.

Vegetable Gardening Made Easy

There are several key elements necessary for a successful and fruitful garden, one of which is “Mother Nature”. We can’t always predict or control what nature brings us, but the following steps can help improve our success rate. The other elements are soil preparation, watering, feeding and pest control.

Soil Preparation
bumperSoil prep is the #1 key to a successful garden. Most of our valley soils have a high clay content and must be loosened to allow for proper drainage and better root growth. The addition of soil amendments or organic conditioners plays a big role in turning our heavy soil into “good garden loam”.

First, remove all large rocks, weeds, and debris from the planting area.  For a 10′ x 10′ sq. area,  rototil into the soil  5- 2 cubic foot bags of Bumper Crop, 4 pounds of E.B. Stone Organic Vegetable Food,  and  5 lbs of Iron Sulfate and between 5 and 40 pounds of gypsum.  This will provide you with a soil that is better draining and rich in nutrients.

See our “Recipe for Good Garden Soil” handout for descriptions of soil amendments.

Planting
matt013Vegetables may be started from seed or “starter” plants.  Seedling “starters”, or better yet, a 4-inch potted plant gives you a head start in the growing process and in many cases is more efficient for the urban garden.  However, if you start from seed, you will have to thin the seedlings as they grow to get stronger, healthier plants.

Spring planting is generally done after the danger of frost, which for the valley is the first week of April.  Spring/Summer crops include tomatoes, peppers, squashes, eggplants, cucumbers, corn, beans, pumpkins, strawberries, and melons.  Some of your leafy green vegetables can also be grown now if given some special care.

Fall planting is generally started as the summer heat subsides, which for the valley is on or about October 1st.  Fall/Winter crops include artichokes, asparagus, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbages, cauliflower, kale, lettuces, mustards, onions, peas, rhubarb, swiss chard, spinach, and potatoes in January.

When planting small starter plants, be extra gentle with the stem where it enters the ground or crown of the plant, as it can be damaged easily in transplanting and then your plant will fail.  Also, make sure not to bury the stem of the plant under extra soil, the crown needs to “breathe”.   The exception is tomato plants, whose stems can be buried.  Each hair will turn into a root. When you plant, mix into the soil a “starter” fertilizer like Sure Start or Master Start.  This helps the young plants develop a stronger root system.

Fertilizing
tomatovegfoodFertilization is the 2nd key component to a fruitful garden.  A “starter” fertilizer like Sure Start, will get your young transplant off to a good beginning.  After about 3-4 weeks you’ll need to start your regular fertilizing schedule.

We recommend using organic or organic based fertilizers once a month since they provide many benefits to the crops and soil.
Fertilizers should never be applied to dry, thirsty plants.  Water your plants first, let a couple hours pass then apply your fertilizer and then water the plants again.  Avoid feeding on extra hot days (over 85 degrees)

Tomato & Vegetable Food 4-5-3
E. B. Stone Tomato & Vegetable Food is formulated from quality natural organic ingredients for use throughout the vegetable garden as well as with soft fruits like strawberries.

It will contribute to even plant growth without producing excessive foliage at the expense of fruit. The additional phosphorous helps to ensure the production of high-quality fruits and vegetables.

The calcium in our Tomato & Vegetable fertilizer aids in preventing disorders like blossom end rot.

Watering
Watering is the 3rd key to a successful garden.  Water new transplants right away and keep young, establishing plants evenly moist. A maturing vegetable garden is perfectly suited to be water-wise since veggies will fruit better if kept on the dry side. Drip systems and soaker hoses can be used for the vegetable garden. Soaker hoses, although left on for an hour or more at a trickle can still reduce water use by as much as 70%.

With drip systems, you’ll need to use 3 emitters per plant, triangulated around the plant,  and run the system for 1 hour to start, then increase it to 2 hours when the plant has grown.  How frequently you will have to water depends mostly on your soil’s water holding capability and secondly on weather conditions.  In general, you want to thoroughly soak your vegetable plants and then let them go dry in between waterings.  When you see the plants wilting (droopy), and you know it’s been awhile since you’ve watered, then it’s time to water again.  However, temperature extremes will cause plants to droop even though they have enough water.

Mulching
Mulching with 3-4 inches of shredded forest material helps to conserve water, moderate soil temperatures near the crown of the plant and discourage weeds.  Studies have also shown that plants that have been mulched, grow faster and develop higher yields in the long term.  We recommend any Master Nursery Bark material.  Mulch in late spring to allow the sun to warm the soil early on.

Pest Management
captainjThe first line of defense for your new plants is to protect them from snails, slugs, and earwigs.  Spread bait, “1 tablespoon per square yard” in a broad pattern out from the plant base of your plants with organic Sluggo Plus.  Read label directions for the frequency of reapplication.  For other pest problems, it is best to identify which pest you’re dealing with before treating.  If you are not sure what you’ve got, you can always bring some into the nursery in a sealed container.  Ladybugs make a good biological control for aphids and some other soft-bodied insects.  Captain Jack’s products, (Spinosad) and Bonide All Season Spray Oil are good broad spectrum pesticides that are organic (OMRI approved) and treat the majority of vegetable pests.

Other Tips & Hints

  • In spring, new plants should be transplanted into the ground late in the day, (just before sunset), so they will not suffer from heat stress.
  • Tomato flowers will not set fruit if nighttime temperatures drop below 55 degrees and usually will drop off.
  • When your tomatoes are blooming, shake the plants to aid in pollination. This will increase fruit set. (This is helpful with peppers too)
  • Even out watering on tomato plants once the fruit has set and begins to color.
  • Cooler night time temperatures delay the ripening of many spring veggies.
  • Mix a tablespoon of Magnesium Sulfate (Epsom Salts) in the bottom of the hole for tomatoes.

 

Tasty Tomatoes

wildboartomatoesTasty Tomatoes For Your Summer Salads! Vegetable Gardens Start This Month!

Feeling adventurous? Ready to try some new tomato varieties this year? We have them! Check out this list of varieties and sizes. We know there’s something to fit your taste and gardening needs.

Try Our Unusual Heirloom Wild Boar Tomatoes

We are featuring, once again, unusual tomatoes from Wold Boar this year in addition to old favorites. Add a few of these tasty tomatoes to your garden mix! We have the following on hand now in 4″ pots.

  • Lush Queen: Striped Pink Beefsteak, a good producer that weighs in between
    6 to 12 ozs.
  • Pink Berkeley Tie-Dye is a Port Wine Beefsteak colored with metallic green stripes. 8 to 12 oz. fruit.
  • Solar Flare is a luscious sweet Red tomato with 6 to 10 oz. fruit.
  • Red Beauty is a medium-sized red fruit with accents of green stripes and purple splashes. 4 to 6 oz.
  • Red Boar is a top notch performer in looks, taste, and production. Produces 2 to 4 oz. fruit.
  • Black & Brown Boar is a dark red color with great flavor. This is an aggressive grower and produces 8 to 12 oz. fruit.
  • Black Beauty is one of the darkest tomatoes that Wild Boar produces. The 4 to 6 oz. fruit is rich, smooth and savory with earth tones.
  • Lucky Gem is a beefsteak with a red and yellow interior. Very prolific and flavorful. Fruit is 4 to 6 oz.
  • Cascade Lava produces 2 to 4 oz. sweet, rich and juicy fruit. It is a medium-sized brick red with green stripes.
  • Dragon’s Eye starts a pink-rose with green stripes that darken to gold. The 2 to 4 oz fruit has dark red flesh.

April is a great month to start planting your vegetable garden. We have seeds, seedlings, and four-inch plants to help get you going. Now is the perfect time to set out tomatoes, eggplant and pepper starts. As temperatures warm plant watermelon, cucumbers, pumpkins, beans, and more. Melons, cucumbers, basil are very cold sensitive.

We have a great selection of tomato cages, snail and bug baits, and vegetable fertilizer along with tips for good growing. Stop by and see us soon!

 

Plant Blueberries for your Health as well as your Tastebuds

Blueberries are just one of the many berries that require very little care and are loaded with both good flavor and health benefits. You can easily enjoy a season-long harvest of health enhancing berries by planting an early season, a mid-season and late season variety.

Plant an abundance of plants if you want to freeze berries to enjoy the rest of the year. It has been said, plant 2 plants for each member of your household to provide a good supply of berries for all.

Blueberries are also very attractive. Their pretty white and pink flowers in spring are followed by delicious fruit in summer. Pick them fresh for eating, baking pies, or pancakes! Plant two blueberry bushes per family member for an ample supply of fresh berries throughout summer. Plant more if you plan to freeze.

These super fruits grow best in afternoon shade with an acidic soil in the ground or in large pots, (a 2×4′ raised bed kit is ideal for 2 blueberry plants). There are many varieties of blueberries with varying fruit sizes and subtle flavor differences to extend the ripening season from late spring into late summer.

Come by and let one of our knowledgeable staff members get you started.

Jubilee
Reveille (Early June)

Reveille has a unique crisp, almost crunchy texture and the outstanding popping flavor is a good performer with large crops of light blue, medium size berries. Planting with another variety can produce a larger Crop, This variety needs around 600 chilling hours. to 5′ high.


Misty
Misty (Early June)
Early season ripening, Misty is one of the most attractive southern highbush varieties. The bright blue-green foliage provides a perfect contrast to the hot pink spring flowers and sky blue summer fruit. The berries are medium to large size and of excellent quality. Misty has an evergreen tendency in areas with mild winters. Yields best when planted with other blueberries. Chilling needs are very low 300 hours*.


Sharp's Blue
Sharp’s Blue (Late May)
Dime-sized berries! Excels in warmer climates as it requires fewer than 500 chilling hours* per year. Fruits are sweet and high in antioxidants. A
popular commercial variety, now you can enjoy these same berries picked fresh from your own backyard. Ripens early in the season.


South Moon
South Moon (Early June)
Delicious, large, sky-blue fruit ripens in early summer. It is highly productive in areas where it will receive as few as 500 hours of winter chill*. White bell-shaped flowers and colorful fall foliage are added ornamental benefits.


Sunshine Blue
O’Neal (Late May, Early June)
O’Neal is known as a Southern Highbush variety because it tolerates hot summers and has low chill requirements. It bears especially sweet and flavorful fruit, but planting with another variety can produce a larger crop. Can get 5′-6″ tall.


*Winter chill hours refers to the total number of hours that temperatures are below 45 degrees throughout the cool season.

Feed acid-loving plants like blueberries now using Cottonseed Meal.  It’s organic, acidic and nitrogen rich.

 

 

 

April Vegetable Guide

Vegetable Gardens Start This Month!

Feeling adventurous? Ready to try some new tomato varieties this year? We’ll have them!

We know there’s something to fit your taste and gardening needs. Prepare your soil with our Recipe for Good Garden Soil. If you want to plant your tomatoes in containers we’ll help you select just the right varieties.

April is a great month to start planting your vegetable garden. We have seeds, seedlings and four-inch plants to help get you going. Once the danger of frost has passed you can set out tomatoes, eggplant and pepper starts.

As temperatures warm plant watermelon, cucumbers, pumpkins, beans, and more. Melons, cucumbers, basil are very cold sensitive. We have a great selection of tomato cages, snail and bug baits, and vegetable fertilizer along with tips for good growing. Stop by and see us soon!

Vegetable Plant Time Amount
Family of 4
Special Notes Plant Now
Artichoke Year ’round 3 – 4 plants Permanent, perennial. 4″ Pots
Beans, String April – May Then later again in July and August 15 – 25 ft. row Suitable for a small garden. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From Starts or Seeds
Beets February – April then later again in August 10 – 15 ft. row Suitable for a small garden. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From Seeds
Cantaloupes/Other melons April – June 5 – 10 hills Soil must be warm. From Starts or Seeds
Carrots Year ’round 20 – 30 ft. row Suitable for a small garden. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From Seeds
Chives Year ’round 1 clump Suitable for a small garden. From Starts or Seeds
Corn, sweet April – July 20 – 30 ft. row Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. Soil must be warm. From Starts or Seeds
Cucumbers April – July 6 plants N/A From Seeds or Starts
Eggplant April – June 4 – 6 plants Suitable for a small garden. Ok in morning sun From Starts
Parsley Year ’round 1 – 2 plants Suitable for a small garden. From Starts
Peppers April – July 5 – 10 plants Suitable for a small garden From Starts
Pumpkins April – June 1 – 3 plants N/A From Starts or seeds
Radishes Year ’round 4 ft. row Suitable for a small garden. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From Seed
Squash, summer April – July 2 – 4 plants Suitable for a small garden. From Starts or seeds
Squash, winter March – September 2 – 4 plants Known as winter Squash because it stores over winter but it grows in summer-fall. From Starts or seeds
Strawberries March – September 12+ plants Bare root in November – 6-Pack arriving in Feb. 6-Packs
Tomatoes March – July 6 – 10 plants Suitable for a small garden. Weather permitting, starting in March is possible. From Starts
Turnips February – August 10 – 15 ft. row Suitable for a small garden. From Seeds
Watermelons April – June 6 plants N/A From Starts or Seeds