Cherries

Plant a Cherry Tree
Fruit trees are here, including Cherries. We have a stunning selection.

Cherries fall into a couple of different groups. Gardeners grow sweet cherries for fresh eating and sour cherries for cooking. Many cherries need a complementary partner/pollenizer planted nearby, but some are fruitful and happy standing alone.

Here is a quick summary of our selection:

Bing Sweet Cherry – Sweet, crisp, dark cherry for fresh eating. Ripens in Early June. Pollenized by Black Tartarian or Rainier

Black Tartarian Sweet Cherry – Softer and earlier than bing – Sprightly Flavor. Ripens in Mid May. Interfruitful with all sweet cherries

Craig’s Crimson Sweet Cherry – Dark red to nearly black, medium to large size, wonderful spicy flavor, very firm texture. Ripens in Mid May. Self-fruitful

English Morello Sour Cherry – Late-ripening tart cherry for cooking. Ripens in Mid June. Self-fruitful

Lapins Sweet Cherry – Self-fruitful, dark red sweet cherry. Ripens in Late May. Self-fruitful

Rainier Sweet Cherry – Large, yellow with red blush. Sweet and flavorful. Ripens in Early June. Pollenized by Bing or Black Tartarian

Stella Sweet Cherry – Large, nearly black, richly flavored sweet cherry. Ripens in Early June. Self-fruitful

Utah Giant Sweet Cherry – Favorite sweet cherry in Utah. Larger, firmer, more flavorful than Bing. Ripens in Late May. Pollenized by Bing or Ranier

Royal Crimson Sweet Cherry – Bright crimson with superb flavor. Ripens in Early May. Self-fruitful

Have you Tried Growing Your Own Potatoes?

potato-russetPotatoes have arrived. Why not give your taste buds a treat by growing your own. They taste remarkably better fresh and growing them is easy; winter rains and colder temperatures take care of them for much of the season, and when harvest time comes they taste far superior to store bought.  Our most popular varieties, as well as specialty spuds, are in stock now.

Here is our Collection.

Colorado Rose
Bred for early, large yields. Beautiful oval tubers with white firm flesh, good for salads or roasting.

Russian Banana
3-4″ long and an inch in diameter, Russian Fingerling potatoes mature in 3-4 months from planting.

Kennebec
One of the most popular and high-yielding potatoes grown.

Adirondack Blue Potato
Tasty purple flesh with bluish skin. Good tasting roasted.

NORKOTA RUSSET (Coming Later this week)
Very similar to Idaho’s famous Burbank. The good old-fashioned baking potato with the rough skin. This one is much more disease resistant than the Burbank and very productive too.

YUKON GOLD (Coming Later this week)
This is an early potato that matures in 65+ days. Buttery yellow flesh is delicious. Variety makes a good steamer/boiler or use in salads.

Purple Viking
An improved variety with white flesh and russeted, patterned, purple skin.

Planting Tips

Preparing the Soil
Like most garden vegetables, potatoes prefer loose well-drained soil. We need to lighten our heavy clay soils by mixing at least 3″ of MASTER NURSERY PLANTING MIX into the top 6″-12″ of soil; you’ll need three bags for every 50 square feet of planting area. Also, incorporate two pounds of MASTER NURSERY 0-10-10 to encourage root and stem growth, and two pounds Iron Sulfate to buffer the soil pH.

Choose “Certified Potatoes”
Our potatoes have been inspected to assure they are disease-free and are ready to be planted in your garden. Choose from our improved selection which includes many of the popular new colored varieties.

Cut and Dry the Potatoes
Cut the potatoes into chunks 1 ½” square with at least two eyes. Spread them in a single layer (cut side up) and allow to air dry at least overnight. Cut surfaces are dry to the touch. The air-dried cut pieces are less likely to rot in the cool, wet soil. Dusting with sulfur before planting will further decrease the chance of disease infection.

Plant
Form rows that are 4″ deep and 2′ apart. Set the seed potato pieces in rows, cut side down, 12″ – 18″ apart. Do not plant if the soil is very wet, but be sure to water thoroughly after planting. Or plant in our fabric bags. Fabric bags are great to grow in, and harvesting is easy.

Hilling Up
The potatoes will form above, not below, the planted pieces. When the plants reach 5″ – 6″ tall, draw up loose soil (or a soil/straw mix) around the plants so that only 2″ of the stem is exposed. Hill soil up again in 2-3 weeks. Hilling up gives the potatoes a light soil to expand into as they grow.

Water & Feed
After growth begins, give the plants regular deep watering (once per week). Feed potatoes monthly with MASTER NURSERY TOMATO AND VEGETABLE FOOD, a balanced fertilizer. This along with the MASTER NURSERY 0-10-I0 and Iron Sulfate incorporated at planting completes the nutritional requirements.

Harvest

Dig early or “new” potatoes when plant tops begin to flower, dig mature potatoes when tops die down. Dig carefully to avoid bruising or cutting them. Store in a dark place at approximately 40 degrees.

As always, check with one of our staff members if you have any further questions.

mna_tomato[1]

What you will need:

  • Master Nursery Planting Mix
  • Master Nursery Tomato & Vegetable Food
  • Master Nursery 0-10-10
  • Iron Sulfate

Grow Potatoes in Fabric Pots

fabric-pot-potatoHave you ever tasted potatoes fresh dug from the garden?  The taste is incomparable to store bought types and growing in a bag or container is very easy.

We have fabric growing pots that have several advantages over conventional garden growing. They drain well and they are easy to harvest.

These fabric planting pots are made with a spun fabric that feels like felt.  The pots drain well, they allow air into the roots and cause the roots to “self-prune” as they hit the edge of the pot. Roots normally hit the wall of a container and simply turn to wrap around the inside of the pot. With fabric pots, the roots prune themselves when they hit the air and they branch instead of turn.

Fabric pots also have the advantage of remaining cool in the sun.  Normal plastic containers can reach hard-to-touch temperatures on a hot day, but fabric pots breathe, releasing the heat.

Grow your Potatoes the Easy Way!

Prepare
Cut seed potatoes into chunks having at least 2 eyes each. Allow the pieces to dry and callous at least overnight.

Fill the container about 1/3 full with a 50/50 mixture of Master Nursery Bumper Crop and either garden soil, or Master Nursery Potting Soil.

Plant
Plant one seed potato for each 3 gallons of fabric pot capacity. For the #15 container, for example, plant 5 seed potatoes. For the #10 container, plant 3 or 4 seed potatoes. Place the seed potatoes evenly in the container.

Water the soil thoroughly. It should be moist but not soggy.

Care
Soon, you will see little stems pop through the soil. Mound up more soil/compost mix, but do not to cover the leaves. The leaves need sun and air exposure.

As the potatoes continue growing, keep adding the soil/compost mix until you reach the top of the container.

Mid to late summer the potato leaves and stems will begin to turn yellow. Timing will vary somewhat depending on the potato variety.

When the foliage has died back and the weather is cooler, stop all watering about 2 weeks prior to harvest. The leaves and stems will turn almost completely yellow. You are ready to harvest.

Harvest
Don’t use a spade or sharp instrument! Pull out all the stems and leaves, wearing gloves. Dig in and find your hidden potatoes.

Store
Arrange potatoes in a single row for a day and allow to dry. Then brush off the soil. Store potatoes in a cool, dry area with good ventilation. Do not store potatoes in the refrigerator!

Bag Care
Fabric containers are reusable! Shake out any extra soil and allow the container to dry. Store in a dry location until you are ready to start again next spring.

Read more about growing potatoes.

January Vegetable Guide

 

Vegetable Plant Time Plants for a family of 4 Special Notes Plant Now
Artichoke Year ’round 3 – 4 plants Permanent, perennial. Bareroot 
Asparagus January – February 30 – 40 plants Permanent, perennial. Pick up free planting guide. Bareroot 
Broccoli August – February 15 – 20 ft. row Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From starts or seeds
Brussels Sprouts August – February 15 – 20 ft. row N/A From starts or seeds
Cabbage August – February 10 – 15 plants Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From starts or seeds
Cabbage, Chinese August – February 10 – 15 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From starts or seeds
Carrots Year ’round 20 – 30 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From Seeds
Cauliflower August – February 10 – 15 plants Tie leaves up and over head to protect from frosts. From starts or seeds
Celery August – February 20 – 30 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From starts or seeds
Chard August – February 3 – 4 plants Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From starts or seeds
Chives Year ’round 1 clump Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From Starts or Seeds
Endive August – February 10 – 15 ft. row N/A From Starts or Seeds
Garlic October – January 10 – 20 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Note: plant through EARLY January for best results From Bulbs
Leeks August – February 10 ft. row N/A From Starts or Seeds
Lettuce August – February 10 – 15 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From Starts or Seeds
Mustard August – April 10 ft. row N/A From Starts or Seeds
Onions  November – March 30 – 40 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. starts
Parsley Year ’round 1 – 2 plants Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From Starts or Seeds
Peas September – January 30 – 40 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From Starts or Seeds
Potatoes January – March 50 – 100 ft. row Arriving Early January for planting through mid-March
Radishes Year ’round 4 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From Seed
Rhubarb December – February 2 – 3 plants Bare root in November – January, Canned in February – April and again in September and October. Bareroot
Spinach September – January 10 – 20 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From Starts or Seeds
Strawberries June – September 12+ plants Bare root in November – 6-Pack arriving in March. Bareroot after 11-12

Figs

pixdfig[1]Fig trees are among the easiest fruit trees that can be grown.  They grow happily in the ground or containers, making them perfect for all kinds of gardeners; they also look great with bold textured, tropical-like leaves spring through fall. They need to be planted in an area with good drainage where they will receive full sun, at least eight hours a day.

In the past, we brought fig trees into the nursery in January with the bare root fruit trees, but figs would prefer not to go through the trauma of bare root transplanting. We now have a very large assortment of fig trees grown in liners, which means they have undisturbed roots and they transplant very well.  All are self-fruitful, very water-wise and long-lived.

Fig Varieties

Black Jack
Large, purplish-brown figs with sweet, juicy, strawberry red flesh. Harvest August to October in Central California. Naturally small (semi-dwarf) tree. Suitable for planting in a large container, or in the ground planting.
Black Mission
The favorite. Purplish-black skin, strawberry – colored flesh, rich flavor. Heavy bearing, large tree. Coast or inland.
Brown Turkey
Large, brown skin, pink flesh. Sweet, rich flavor, used fresh. Widely adapted – coast or inland climate. A small tree, prune to any shape.
Kadota
Large, light greenish-yellow ‘white’ skin, amber flesh. Vigorous. Prune to any shape. Very sweet fruit needs hot weather to ripen.

 

Pomegranates – Ornamental – Edible – Wholesome

pome2014[1]
Pomegranates are a delicious and juicy fruit as well as a beautiful water-saving landscape shrub or small tree. They are perfectly happy in our warm sunny climate, producing showy orange-red blooms in summer followed by beautiful bright red fruits that ripen in late fall. There are several varieties of Pomegranates to choose from including Wonderful, Pink Satin, and Eversweet.

pomegranate-smallThey are also healthy. The juice around the seeds is laden with antioxidants, very delicious and a delight to eat. Fruit can be juiced and the seeds removed through a strainer if you object to a mouthful of edible seeds. Pomegranates are great for jelly making.

All pomegranates are long-lived, self-fruitful and they are also naturally water-wise; they can be grown in any well-drained soil. A look through the garden on a spring or summer day will seldom turn up a pest on a pomegranate they are basically free of pests or disease.

Varieties

Ambrosia
Medium to large size fruit with pale pink skin. Large seeds with exceptionally sweet, amber-pink juice. Good source of antioxidants. Inland or coastal climate.

Eversweet
Very sweet, virtually seedless fruit. (Even immature fruits are sweet.) Red skin, clear (non-staining) juice. Harvest late summer through fall. Coast or inland. 8-10 ft. arching shrub, or train as tree or espalier. Large, showy, orange-red flowers.

Pink Satin
Medium to large size, medium pink to dark red fruit with medium to large, light-pink edible seeds. Wonderful refreshing light-colored juice is non-staining, with a sweet, fruit punch flavor. The plant is vigorous and can be grown as a shrub or tree and kept any height by summer pruning. Eat fresh, juice or use in salads.

Sharp Velvet
Large sized pomegranate with a very appealing, unique mildly acid refreshing flavor. The fruit has a dark red exterior and dark seeds, the color of crushed red velvet. Upright growing plant sets huge crops of highly ornamental fruit and can be kept any height with summer pruning. Eat fresh or use in cooking.

pomegranate-seedsWonderful
Large, purple-red fruit with delicious, tangy flavor. Best quality in hot inland climate. Red-orange bloom, ornamental foliage.

Tea Camellias


Consider Growing your Tea.

A beautiful collection of tea camellias (Camellia sinensis) have shipped into the nursery, and are blooming with delicate white flowers now.

Who on your gift list enjoys a warm cup of tea to warm the morning soul, or soothe the afternoon stress? What could be more delightful than to give the gift of a living tea plant?  Bring beauty to a bright-shade garden and provide a very personal supply of tea leaves to a tea lover in your life. So why wait? Come in and finish your shopping!

Growing Climate

Camellia sinensis – or Tea Camellia grows in a broad variety of climates around the world. Tea is grown commercially in both tropical & temperate zones including China, Japan, and the US.

In our area, the Tea Camellia plant prefers a bright shade location.  The morning sun side of your house or under the dappled shade of a large tree would suit the plant well.

Soil should remain moist, not wet and drain should drain well.  It also needs to be kept on the acidic side. Therefore, plant all camellias in a mixture of Nurseryman’s Acid Planting Mixed 75% with 25% native soil. Feed with Azalea Camelia food and treat 2-3 times a year with Iron Sulfate to keep the pH on the acidic side.

Harvest

Tea is harvested as the first flush of leaves emerge in early spring.  Another can occur when a second and possible third flush of leaves appear in late spring/summer. Flowers arrive in fall; ours are blooming now.

 

Alternatives to the Traditional Christmas Tree

Consider a living tree to decorate this holiday season — Colorado and Alberta spruce are two great traditional choices.  If you want to be daring here are some fun alternatives:

  • Citrus already decorated with fruit, Japanese maples or Strawberry Tree, whose branches already have red and orange hanging “ornaments”
  • A holly plant
  • A blooming Yuletide camellia whose bright red single flowers may well be decoration enough, or
  • A fruiting olive
  • Spiral clipped Boxwood
  • Bay Laurel makes a beautiful container plant.
    They can be trained to form a small tree, cone, or remain as a bush.

vertcitrus[1]
Meyer Lemons
All of these possibilities would make great landscape plants at the season’s end. If there’s no room in your garden, consider a bonsai plant, or how about donating your plant to the garden of a local school, park or church? What a great way to green our communities.

Here are some helpful hints to keep your living Christmas tree healthy and happy.

This is a hard one-try to minimize its indoor time. A week to ten days is a good maximum to be in the house. Choose a well-lit area away from the heat of a fireplace or furnace. Protect the floor with a cork trivet topped with a large saucer to catch the watering water. In between deep waterings water your plant with ice cubes that slowly melt (helpful hint: use a turkey baster to relieve excess water from the saucer after the plant has had an hour or so to reabsorb it).

Decorate with small lights and light-weight ornaments.

December Vegetable Guide

December Vegetables

Vegetable

Plant Time

Amount Family of Four

Special Notes

Plant Now

Artichoke Year ’round 3 – 4 plants Permanent, perennial Bareroot after mid-November
Asparagus January – February 30 – 40 plants Permanent, perennial. Pick up free planting guide. Bareroot after mid-November
Broccoli August – February 15 – 20 ft. row Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From starts or seeds
Brussels Sprouts August – February 15 – 20 ft. row N/A From starts or seeds
Cabbage August – February 10 – 15 plants Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From starts or seeds
Cabbage, Chinese August – February 10 – 15 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From starts or seeds
Carrots Year ’round 20 – 30 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From Seeds
Cauliflower August – February 10 – 15 plants Tie leaves up and over head to protect from frosts. From starts or seeds
Celery August – February 20 – 30 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From starts or seeds
Chard August – February 3 – 4 plants Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From starts or seeds
Chives Year ’round 1 clump Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From Starts or Seeds
Endive August – February 10 – 15 ft. row N/A From Starts or Seeds
Garlic October – January 10 – 20 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Note: plant through EARLY January for best results From Bulbs
Kohlrabi August – November 10 – 15 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From Starts or Seeds
Leeks August – February 10 ft. row N/A From Starts or Seeds
Lettuce August – February 10 – 15 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From Starts or Seeds
Mustard August – April 10 ft. row N/A From Starts or Seeds
Onions (bare root) November – December 60 plants Stockton red, white & yellow. Suitable for small garden. Plant 2″ apart, thin and use during the winter. Leave 6″-8″ between remaining plants. Harvest large hamburger slicers in June. Bundles
Onions (bulb) November – March 30 – 40 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Bulbs
Onions (green) August – December —- Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From Starts or Seeds
Parsley Year ’round 1 – 2 plants Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From Starts or Seeds
Peas September – January 30 – 40 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From Starts or Seeds
Radishes Year ’round 4 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. Can be planted more than once/year for a continuous harvest. From Seed
Rhubarb December – February 2 – 3 plants Bare root in November – January, Canned in February – April and again in September and October. Bareroot from mid-November
Spinach September – January 10 – 20 ft. row Suitable for a small garden if compact varieties are grown. From Starts or Seeds
Strawberries June – September 12+ plants Bare root in November – 6-Pack arriving in March. Bareroot after mid-November

Berries

Berries and grapes have arrived for the season.

Berries are among the easiest edibles to grow. Our central California grower has shipped a huge variety of berries this week.  Select and plant them now to establish the largest plants by summer. Varieties include Black, Boysen, Raspberry, plus currants and Blueberries, Grapes, Kiwi, and more.

Varieties


pix8blacksatin.Blackberry
Used in Europe for over 2000 years for culinary and medicinal purposes, they are actually a member of the rose family.

Often scarce in local markets, homeowners may have to grow them or do without! Fortunately, they are hardy and easy to grow. Their fruit is delicious eaten freshly picked, added to desserts for both flavor and contrast and they work well with a variety of recipes such as tarts, pies, and pastries.

pix8berrybabaRaspberry
For at least 10,000 years raspberries have been used as a food and it is no wonder considering the versatility of this tasty fruit.

Raspberries are ideal for breakfast cereal, in jellies and jams, flavoring for entrees at dinner and they also make a great stand-alone fresh-fruit dessert or enhancement topping for others.

After Planting Berries according to information referenced below, feed them spring, summer, and fall using Master Nursery Fruit Tree & Vine Food.

Planting

Blackberries, Raspberries, and Olallie Berries are as easy as pie to plant. Select and area with full sun and Improve soil using Master Nursery Gold Rush.

Blueberries require a little extra preparation, but the benefits are worth every effort. Plant Blueberries in an area with filtered afternoon shade.  Improve the soil using Master Nursery Acid Planting Soil.

Click here to download our Planting Berries Flier.